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Ann Carlson '81, Ph. D

In this Section

Senior Science Policy Advisor, Retired
1 Park Ave.
Malone, NY 12953


Phone: (518)483-1316
Email: abcarlson@widomaker.com


Education: B.S. Clarkson University, M.S. George Washington University, Ph.D. North Carolina State University


After obtaining a BS in Physics at Clarkson in 1981, I first went to work at Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA as a Mechanical Engineer performing heat transfer analyses and designing satellite cooling systems for NASA's Earth and Space Science missions. Later, I obtained a Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering with a specialization in hypersonic aerothermodynamics, and worked as a traditional research scientist in this field at NASA Langley for several years, collaborating with North Carolina State University to participate in the training of graduate students and postdocs. When this field of research lost its primary funding, I switched specialties to Earth and Atmospheric Sciences research, retraining and eventually building my own research program in applications of Earth observing data to support agriculture and energy projects. From 1995 to 1999, I also participated in organizational management at Langley Research Center, culminating with 4 months as the Acting Head of Atmospheric Sciences (approx. 100 employees and an annual budget of $85 M). In 1999, I transferred to NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, first in the Earth Science Applications Division and then transferring to the Office of the Chief Scientist in 2000. At this point, my career focus switched to science policy. I have continued to work in this broad field throughout the rest of my career, which subsequently included 3 years at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and 4 years in the Office of the Director at the National Science Foundation. I retired to Malone, NY in November 2009.


The knowledge and experiences I bring to the Arts and Sciences Advisory Committee are; 1) extensive familiarity with the federal funding agencies and with federal science policy, 2) detailed understanding of the federal research and development budget priority development and funding processes, especially as they relate to academic research investments, and 3) several years active participation in federal math and science education policy development and implementation at all levels ("k through gray").



Ann Carlson