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Computing Programs

In this Section

At Clarkson, you can embark on an exciting future in the world of computers through any one (or combination) of five different majors.

Hands-on Experience
Each program builds skills in a particular aspect of computers and computing. In any of them, you'll benefit from excellent professors, personal attention, state-of-the-art computing facilities, and hands-on, project-based learning. Computing courses emphasize a collaborative approach to creative problem solving and development of communications skills. Co-ops and internships give you on-the-job opportunities.

Mix and Match
Clarkson has a rich array of computer resources and is known for flexibility and interdisciplinary interaction, cooperation and collaboration. You can pursue a specialized concentration, for example, or a minor along with your major, or you might even take a double major in two complementary programs.

Computer Engineering
Computer engineers work on hardware, software and the interface between the two. They bring together computer science, electrical engineering, mathematics and science, and modern computer-based tools. They apply sound problem-solving skills to design, build and maintain systems that contain or use computers.

Here are some examples: hardware or chip design, verification, testing, board level design, or design of application-specific integrated circuits, interactive user interface design, database applications, software tool development, and the creation of graphical interfaces.

Every computer engineering student builds a base of expertise in both hardware and software design, object-oriented programming and software components, analog and digital circuits and systems, logic design, and processor interfacing. You'll build systems in which you integrate both hardware and software components.

Computer Science
Computer scientists design computers and software, develop information technologies, and develop and adapt principles for applying computers to new uses. They must bring theoretical expertise and an innovative approach to the solution of complex problems and to the creation or application of new technology.

In industry, computer scientists may design and develop computer software, programming tools, programming languages, new information technologies, or even computer games. In academic institutions, they work in areas ranging from hardware to artificial intelligence, robotics and computational complexity theory. Many computer scientists become software engineers responsible for specifying, designing, implementing, integrating and supporting software systems.

The flexibility of the curriculum allows you to pursue special interests and master a number of skills that are widely sought after in the job market including: software systems, hardware development, scientific applications, information systems, management systems, and network administration.

Software Engineering
Software engineering is much more than just programming. You'll learn sound principles of engineering design and key computer science concepts, and then apply that knowledge to the design of software environments. This field addresses critical issues across the life cycle of a software product, beginning with a proposal to develop an application that requires computing resources and continuing through the development, testing, operation and maintenance of the software product.

The software engineer is a key player in most modern high-tech innovations and crucial business systems. Because software plays a vital role in so many aspects of our lives, career opportunities are enormous. Software engineers work in virtually every sector of the economy and are responsible for specifying, designing, implementing, integrating, testing and supporting software systems in a team environment.

Software engineering is distinctive at Clarkson because it is interdisciplinary. We combine the expertise, knowledge and experience of faculty from both the Computer Engineering and the Computer Science departments.

Communication
Computer-mediated communications are revolutionizing the way we live — and also creating an abundance of new career opportunities. If you're interested in getting involved in this exciting digital world, Communication will help you build key skills. Whether you are creating new materials for the Web, developing digital video, generating interactive multimedia, or simply telecommuting, the better you can use computers as communication tools, the better you will do your job.

Recent Communication graduates are applying their technical expertise and communication abilities in such varied roles as Webmaster, multimedia programmers, information engineers, interface designers, and public relations executives.

As one of the major technological institutions in the Northeast, we offer a curriculum requiring more technical rigor than most other Communication programs. At Clarkson, you will not train for a particular career or job. Rather, you will gain the skills you need to take advantage of the evolving digital landscape and its ever-changing needs and demands.

Information Systems and Business Processes
Businesses today depend heavily on the use of information technologies to manage operations. Information systems and business processes describe the integration of information technologies into the business environment. This includes both skills in working with people and an understanding of the technologies of computers, networks and databases as they apply to business operations.

By knowing information technology, business processes, and organization management, graduates can choose among career areas such as database designer, network administrator, information analyst, and application developer.

To give each student a solid foundation, the fundamental concepts are covered in a number of required courses. These concepts include business applications for the Internet; data communications and networks; database programming, and administration; e-Business fundamentals; project management; analysis and design.

Students can then focus their studies to more closely fit their career interests. Electives can include courses or projects in the areas of supply chain systems modeling, Internet consulting, system administration in Novell or Windows NT, Internet marketing, and managing of technology.

Five Computing Degrees
Computer Engineering

Computer Science

Software Engineering

Communication

Information Systems and Business Processes

Related Minors
Computer Science
Software Engineering