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    Clarkson University
    Box 5535
  • Phone: 315/268-4483
05-03-2012

Clarkson University Digital Arts & Sciences Senior Exhibition May 11

[A photograph for media use is available at http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/das-senior-show-2012.jpg.]

Clarkson University's Digital Arts & Sciences senior exhibition will take place on Friday, May 11, at 5 p.m. in Bertrand H. Snell Hall, Room 213.

The poster for Clarkson University's Digital Arts & Sciences senior exhibition, which will take place on Friday, May 11, at 5 p.m. in Bertrand H. Snell Hall, Room 213.The public is invited to attend this free event, which will be followed by a short reception, including refreshments, for the artists.

This screening-style exhibition and presentation will highlight all five seniors in four unique capstone projects. These students represent the 2012 graduating class of digital arts & sciences majors at Clarkson University.

The four ambitious projects cover a wide variety of subjects, including storytelling through animation, website development, tool creation for digital artists, and algorithm-based caricature drawings.

The following projects will be shown:

Emily Luckette of DeWitt, N.Y., and Courtney Green of Rochester, N.Y., have teamed up to create the software application “Caricature Yourself” http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/luckette-green-das-2012.jpg . Developed using the popular mathematical software MATLAB, Caricature Yourself translates a photographic portrait into a caricature. This application differentiates itself from other, similar software packages by using sophisticated algorithmic drawing mechanisms.

Green is a digital arts and science and computer science double major. Her future includes plans to attend graduate school for math education.

While Green used this project as an opportunity to improve her programming skills, Luckette used it to successfully combine her graphic design and two-dimensional art skills with her technical computing and mathematical background. After college, she aims to find a career that will integrate the technical and design skills she developed during college.

Iman Khondker of Potsdam, N.Y., created the captivating digital 3D animation “Orchid” http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/khondker-das-2012.jpg . Iman is an accomplished digital 3D artist with a strong background in the fine arts. She wanted her animation to showcase her traditional art skills, while stressing their importance in fully realizing and pushing the limits of digital media. Viewers can follow the journey from paper to animation, while experiencing the strange tale of Orchid and her pet spider.

Mary Larrousse of Sterling, Mass., has developed a tool that allows 3D models to be virtually shattered, based on artists’ drawings of crack patterns http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/larrousse-das-2012.jpg . Mary is a technical artist who realized that similar 3D shattering effect tools relied on computationally heavy physics simulations that were often unintuitive for the artists who were likely to use these tools. Her tool, created very much from the visual artist’s perspective, will not only create an accurately shattered 3D model every time, but also significantly reduce reliance on processor intensive tasks.

Nathan Seymour of Akwesasne, Ont., worked on the “Akwesasne.ca Redesign” website development project http://www.clarkson.edu/news/photos/seymour-das-2012.jpg . Functioning as a proposed regional and community hub, this website was a way for Seymour to fulfill his desire to both push his web-designing skills, while giving something back to his hometown. He worked with the webmaster of the current website to get feedback on the current design and find out how it could be improved. Seymour’s design process addressed not just aesthetic concerns but also the sociopolitical issues that shape the community. He hopes the project will be of assistance to his community and those visiting Akwesasne.

The Digital Arts & Sciences Program is an interdisciplinary major, which spans the boundaries between the sciences and the arts. Students take advantage of programs in digital art, mathematics, computer science, and communication & media.

The program’s objective is to combine artistic and scientific skills and interests to develop creative talent, with a strong technical foundation. Graduates from this program pursue careers in media like product design, video games, film, graphic design, animation, Web design, and architecture. For more information about Digital Arts & Sciences, visit http://www.clarkson.edu/digitalarts .

If you have any questions, please contact Bang Geul Han, assistant professor of digital arts & sciences, at bhan@clarkson.edu or 315-268-6466.

Clarkson University launches leaders into the global economy. One in five alumni already leads as a CEO or senior executive of a company. Located just outside the Adirondack Park in Potsdam, N.Y., Clarkson is a nationally recognized research university for undergraduates with select graduate programs in signature areas of academic excellence directed toward the world’s pressing issues. Through 50 rigorous programs of study in engineering, business, arts, sciences and health sciences, the entire learning-living community spans boundaries across disciplines, nations and cultures to build powers of observation, challenge the status quo, and connect discovery and engineering innovation with enterprise.

Photo caption: The poster for Clarkson University's Digital Arts & Sciences senior exhibition, which will take place on Friday, May 11, at 5 p.m. in Bertrand H. Snell Hall, Room 213.

[News directors and editors: For more information, contact Michael P. Griffin, director of News & Digital Content Services, at 315-268-6716 or mgriffin@clarkson.edu.]

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