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figure 2

Figure 2. . Kinetics of rapid destruction of toxic bupivacaine anesthetic by microemulsion containing P450 enzyme.

figure 3
Figure 3 . Structure of a proposed "ideal" nanoparticle for remediation of overdosed lipophilic chemicals from blood .

 

figure 4

 

Figure 4. Surface chemical features of a nanoparticle showing covalently attached p acceptor aromatic rings complexed in two possible ways to toxin p donor aromatic rings.

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4. Dispersed phases (1 - 3), but with an enzyme incorporated into the particle matrix capable of destroying an overdosed drug. Figure 2 shows that this option is viable. An "ideal" dispersed phase for use in detoxification might be some combination of the four types, as shown in Figure 3.

Professor Partch is focusing his organic chemical expertise on surface modification of particles to achieve the goals of this project. The cores of such particles include metal oxides as well as various organic biopolymers. Figure 4 shows one structural concept that successfully causes toxins to bind to carrier particles and thereby be deactivated. The fundamental basis for the binding is strong intermolecular interaction between electron deficient and electron enriched benzene rings.

His team has prepared 5-15nm silica particles having surface areas greater than 800 m2/g (which bind negligible toxin) and with 80-100 covalently attached p electron deficient acceptor benzene rings per particle. Particles with attached receptors have very high affinity for toxin molecules such as bupivacaine and cocaine, even when only 0.05% solids are administered. (See Figure 5.) They are also useful for removing overdosed polycyclic aromatic pharmaceuticals and carcinogens, all of which have p electron rich rings.