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CAMP Presents Awards to Outstanding Sponsors at its Annual Technical Meeting

CAMP presented awards to outstanding sponsors at its Annual Technical Meeting held in Canandaigua, NY during the month of May. Award recipients include Xerox Fellow Dr. Santokh Badesha and Senior Vice President Dr. John Laing (both of Xerox, a Corporate Sponsor for CAMP), Vice President Dr. Charles Craig (of Corning, a Corporate Sponsor for CAMP), Chief Technologist Dr. John Spoonhower (of Kodak, a Corporate Sponsor for CAMP), Business Manager John Prendergast (of Ferro, a Corporate Sponsor for CAMP), and Chief Executive Officer Keith Blakely (of NanoDynamics, a Corporate Member for CAMP). Also CAMP Deputy Director Edward McNamara received an outstanding service award. The awards were presented by Clarkson University President Anthony Collins, Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S.V. Babu, and Director of Programs at NYSTAR Kathleen Wise.


From left: Dr. John Spoonhower (Chief Technologist at Kodak), Clarkson University President Anthony Collins, and Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S. V. Babu.

From left: Dr. John Laing (Senior Vice President of Xerox), Clarkson University President Anthony Collins, Xerox Fellow Dr. Santokh Badesha, and Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S. V. Babu.
From left: John Prendergast (Business Manager at Ferro), Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S. V. Babu, and Kathleen Wise (Director of Programs at NYSTAR).

From left: Keith Blakely (Chief Executive Officer of NanoDynamics), Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S. V. Babu, and Kathleen Wise (Director of Programs at NYSTAR).
. From left: Dr. Charles Craig (Vice President of Corning), Clarkson University President Anthony Collins, Dr. Dipak Chowdhury (Research Director at Corning), Christopher Wightman (Research Patent Liaison at Corning), and Distinguished University Professor / CAMP Director S. V. Babu.

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Polymer Thin Films for Pharmaceutical Applications

CAMP Professor Yuzhuo Li studies various polymer thin films for pharmaceutical applications such as Waterless Drug Delivery Systems (WDDS), Controlled Release Systems (CRS), and Temperature Activated Release Systems (TARS). The thin films are typically spin coated with a desirable chemical composition including solvent, specialty polymers, model drugs, and other chemical additives. The thin films are then studied using various analytical techniques such as AFM or SEM for surface topography and porosity, and FTIR for chemical changes upon contact with water or other external stress. Also the UV/Vis spectrophotometer is used for kinetics of chemical reactions or physical changes. A WDDS film is designed to release drugs in the polymer matrix with a very small amount of water, like that available in our mouth. The drug is either in an active or caged nanoparticle form upon release. It is sometimes desirable to have the drugs in a particulate form until they reach certain targeted areas. A CRS film is often used to either protect the drug component underneath the polymer film coat or it contains cleavable drug components. For a polymer thin film that serves as a physical barrier, upon dissolution of the polymer film coat, the drugs underneath start to interact with water and release. For polymers that contain drugs that can be activated upon hydrolysis, it is critical for the polymers to have the right three dimensional structures as well as chemical properties. For TARS films, researchers control the release of the encapsulated component by adjusting the phase behavior of the polymer-surfactant system at body temperature.

Amorphous C / H Films

Professor S.V. Babu and a group of his students are developing thin films of various compositions of C, H, F, and other additives to improve their characteristics such as moisture and water barriers, corrosion resistance, adhesion to various substrates, transmission and antireflection properties as well as erosion and wear resistance. This is a continuation of the earlier work from his group on diamond like carbon films deposited from butadiene and other source gases using 13.56 MHZ low pressure plasma deposition.

PARTICLE TRANSPORT, DEPOSITION AND REMOVAL

Inhalation Drug Delivery and Lung Deposition

Clarkson Distinguished Professor Goodarz Ahmadi (the Robert R. Hill ‘48 Professor and Dean of Engineering) and Professor Philip Hopke (the Bayard D. Clarkson Distinguished Professor), in collaboration with Dr. Yung Sung Cheng of Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, are studying particle and fiber deposition in the human lung and nose for a NIOSH funded project. Earlier Professor Ahmadi and Dr. Han and Dr. Greenspan of Elan (Dura) Pharmaceuticals studied powder dispersion in inhalation drug delivery systems.